Livonia Professional Firefighters
IAFF Local 1164 - Serving The City Of Livonia Since 1941
  • August 16, 2018
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    Click here for a recent article about suicide in the fire service. 

    PREVENTING CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING

    • Service all heating systems and all gas-, oil- or coal-burning appliances by a technician annually.

    • Install a battery-operated and electric-powered carbon monoxide detector in your home and check or replace the battery when you change the time on your clocks each spring and fall. If the detector sounds, leave your home immediately and call 911.

    • Contact a doctor if you believe you have carbon monoxide poisoning.

    • Do not use gas-powered devices such as a generator, grill or stove inside your home, basement or near a near a window or door. Generators should be operated more than 15 feet from the home.

    • Do not run any gas-powered motor inside a closed structure, such as a garage.

    • Do not heat a home with a gas oven.

    IAFF Local Newswire
     
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    Updated: Aug. 16 (11:10)

    Membership Meeting
    IAFF Local F-102
    Rochester FF Thurber Benefit
    Professional Fire Fighters of New Hampshire
    Passing of Captain Hector Lopez
    Waterbury Fire Fighters Association
    Mission BBQ 9-11 Never Forget Cup sale
    IAFF 1826
    Local 21 Regrets To Announce The Passing Of Retired Firefighter Jack Addyman
    IAFF Local 21
    Tuesday, August 14, 2018 Ct. Primary Day
    UPFFA
     
         
  • Fire safety may not be what it seems
    Posted On: Jul 15, 2010

    Besides working full-time for Livonia Fire Rescue, I love teaching and learning about other fire departments, the various fire causes and ways to keep our citizens safer from the ravages of fire. Every once in a while, I have to stop and scratch my head.

    The United States has many more fires per capita than almost every other country out there. We also rate poorly on the fire death and injury rate as well, falling far behind most other comparable countries. So, why do we have so many fires?

    One reason may be our national attitude on fires. In the United States, we call so many of them “accidental.” That merely means they were not deemed intentional. These fires could, in most cases, have been prevented with some common sense and fire safety practices put into place. If we have someone lose their home by fire, we do the neighborly thing and help them get through the tough times with outpourings of gifts and money. In Japan and other countries, severe penalties are imposed regardless of how unintentional the fire was. The crime is called “grave negligence” and can lead to sentences of imprisonment.

    In Germany, you are personally liable for the damage done to anyone else's property if you were found to have caused the fire. If someone dies in the fire, it is a manslaughter charge. In France, insurance companies design their policies so that you will suffer a loss after any fire, even if it is not your fault. In Switzerland, insurance proceeds are used only to rebuild exactly the same structure on the same lot. No cash is given or offered, which keeps their arson rate much lower than ours.

    Love it or hate it, the system we have is what we have. It's probably not going to change much in the near future. Let's take a look at how we can keep our homes safer from fire. First and foremost, have plenty of working smoke alarms in the home. Go around the home and test them with the family there, so that they can begin to recognize the sound it makes when it is activating. Take a look at your insurance coverage to make sure any loss you may take is an acceptable risk for your family. Many insurance companies offer a “home security” discount, giving you a reduction in premiums if you have deadbolts on your doors, smoke alarms and a fire extinguisher. Check into it.

    Now head outside and make sure any fire you or your neighbor may have will not be able to easily spread to your home. Keep the grass and shrubs watered, eliminate long overhanging foliage, and clean up any stored materials between houses and garages. Install motion sensor lighting as a deterrent to people who don't belong in your yard. These simple steps can go a long way when it comes to fire safety.

    Tom Kiurski is training coordinator for the Livonia Fire Department.


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